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Masquerade Metaphysics
Bar Harbor
alexx_kay
Talking with rickthefightguy recently, he mentioned why he had stopped playing Vampire: The Masquerade LARPs. It was after the second time that he had built up a character with a great deal of power, both in terms of combat and politics, had started arguing that The Masquerade was a stupid idea which be abandoned, and had that character summarily killed by an extremely powerful NPC. Sensing the pattern, he declined to go through it again.

Now, on one level, it’s obvious why that happened. When a player attempts to undermine one of the very foundations of the game world, the GMs HAVE to stop that from succeeding. And The Masquerade IS one of the foundational points of the game; its presence in the title is no accident. It marks a genre distinction, between Secret History and Alternate History. In a Secret History setting, if you’re willing to suspend your disbelief enough, you can just barely believe that the details of the setting might actually be true. By contrast, an Alternate History setting is obviously and irrevocably not the world we are living in. A Secret History can become an Alternate History, but it’s a very significant one-way change. An author might be willing to make that change for a setting of his (Charles Stross has done so twice so far), but GMs who are running a licensed setting are going to be understandably reluctant to make such a large and fundamental change to that setting. Even if they were willing in theory, making such a change is a LOT of work, for both GMs AND players.

Of course, all that is a Doyle-ist explanation, and I far prefer Watsonian ones whenever possible. So I started considering possible solutions from that angle.

The Masquerade IS, on the face of it, a pretty stupid political idea. It carries very high costs for very arguable benefits. But what if it WASN’T a political idea at all, what if it was an existential one? Not prescriptive, but descriptive? Posit a world where the Rules of Reality (a superset of the laws of physics) prevent vampires, werewolves, etc. from being acknowledged by society.

I have read a number of time travel stories where, when you try to change history, you can make small local changes, but the timestream “cancels them out” with a series of what would normally be considered low probability events. This is just a science-fiction gloss on one of the classic conceptions of Fate, or how one has to pay the appropriate “price” in a magical bargain. Technically, you can avoid fated outcome X, but that will just result in outcome Y, which is much worse. A really skilled sorcerer, who has anticipated many of the possible outcomes, might avoid X, Y, and even Z – but that just leads to an Omega which is nigh-apocalyptic.

So, imagine that that is what The Masquerade is designed to avoid. Before it was established, there may have been incidents where powerful vampire clans attempted to reach some sort of stable political arrangement with humanity at large, only to have those clans entirely wiped out by mysterious accidents. Maybe not just clans, but one or more entire mythological SPECIES. As soon as this pattern is understood, there is a strong incentive to create political structures that will prevent anything like it from happening again. The rank-and-file wouldn’t even have to understand the true reasons for The Masquerade, as long as they scrupulously followed the rules. (It occurs to me, I’ve just invented a Secret History of a Secret History. Yay, recursion!)

In a world like this, when a character like Rick’s started getting too powerful and threatening The Masquerade, instead of killing him outright, some of the clan elders would quietly take him aside and tell him what was really going on. In most such cases, the troublemaker would cease to cause trouble. (I’ve been rereading H.P. Lovecraft, and a very similar situation occurs in “The Shadow Over Innsmouth”. When the US military does a lot of violent, top-secret stuff in the vicinity of Innsmouth, at first, a bunch of newspaper reporters are very inquisitive about it. They are quietly told at least a piece of what’s really going on, and why they shouldn’t write about it, and they mostly shut up.)

As a further thought experiment, how might the Rules of Reality have come to exist in such a way? I’ve come up with one model, though doubtless there are others possible. Consider a universe that begins much like many primitive creation myths: at first there is formless chaos, but eventually gods coalesce out of it. The first generation of gods don’t do much except (perhaps accidentally) create the second generation of gods, which promptly overthrow and/or kill the first generation, and start building the physical universe out of their remains. This early version of the universe contains mankind, but is still pretty chaotic and “magical”. One God can declare something about reality and make it true, but another God can easily come along and declare something else, or even the opposite.

Eventually, more generations of gods happen, getting more sophisticated over time. As these gods gradually form more complex and stable societies among themselves, they begin to realize that a universe where the nature of reality is in constant flux is “bad for business”. The majority faction of the gods decide to impose a consistent Physics on the universe (possibly some time during the Roman Empire). But, though they are a majority, there exists enough powerful dissent that compromises must be made. Certain entities (e.g. vampires) which do not actually obey the laws of Physics are allowed to be “grandfathered” in – with restrictions. They are only allowed to exist on the fringes; if their presence became known, it would be a threat to Physics, which is not permitted.

Maybe what happens to a sufficiently determined vampire who avoids the vampire legal system and attempts to go public, is that he discovers, much to his surprise, that he is NOT a vampire, but an ordinary human being except for some broken brain chemistry that has driven him insane…

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Now THAT sounds like an interesting spin on an old story!

I think it'd be particularly neat, taken from the perspective of the insane guy who used to think he was a vampire, but is coming to grips and recovering (only to have his actual vampiric powers return), who then hunts down just what the hell is going on with reality.

Now, if only someone had time to write that novel...

I dunno, Masquerade seems logical enough a street to go down. Vampires are generally considered by humans to be destructive, so it makes sense that they'd want to hide their existence. However, I've also seen a number of fantastical worlds wherein your second thought on the matter - the one about it being socially impossible for normal humans to accept the existence of vampires, werewolves, etc. "Supernatural", for instance, does that pretty well.

Now an interesting road to travel, to my mind at least, would be one that creates a world where vampires AREN'T destructive and dangerous. Maybe there's something good about them, which is why they exist? Or, even if you kept to the old saw about them, have humans and vampires trying to make political alliances in the way humans would do it in their own society, i.e. through marriage.

It's a thought.

There are shreds of this in, e.g., Werewolf: The Apocalypse. There, the Veil _is_, whether you want it to be or not. Humans will swear up and down that that was just a very large doggie that was able to open doors and drive a police car, and that guy's wounds look quite vicious but not inconsistent with a very large doggie bite despite clearly being something else.

Mage (:tA) has the universe enforcing the rules as well; Paradox leans on you hard if you try to shift the fundamental paradigms too fast. That could lead to the effect you describe, and explain a societal-imposed Masquerade.

It'd be interesting to posit that the Veil (and Delirium, the madness that mortals acquire when seeing werewolves in full effect) are the results of tinkering by a long-ago Mage, who was tired of entire mythological species evaporating under the weight of Paradox. A master of Mind with some Prime and Spirit could probably pull this off (Mind to affect the humans, Spirit to clearly identify Werewolves and make it a racial trait, and Prime to keep the spell powered throughout the ages.)

In this world, Vampires didn't have such a "friend", and so have to remain extant via this ridiculous agreement that is somehow honored even by such sworn enemies...

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